August 24, 2021 zacherlaw 0 Comments

The CDC recently published recommendations for the best practices of disinfecting a hot tub that contains Legionella. It is vitally important that hot tubs are properly disinfected when Legionella is found. Hot tubs are a well-documented source of Legionella, the bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ disease. As the water heats up, some of the water particles are aerosolized. These are then inhaled by those in and around the hot tub. If these particles contain Legionella, there is a chance that the individual who inhaled it could get very sick. The first step in the disinfection process is to close the hot tub immediately.…

August 21, 2021 zacherlaw 0 Comments

The New Jersey Department of Health is investigating a potential outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in Essex County, NJ. Between July 16 and July 26, eight suspected cases were reported to the Department of Health. All of the infected individuals either reside in Essex County or have recently visited Essex County. [1] The New Jersey Health Commissioner, Judy Persichilli, urges any individual that resides in or has visited Essex County in the past two weeks to visit their doctor if they begin experiencing symptoms. Symptoms can include fever, fatigue, headache, muscle aches, chills, shortness of breath, loss of appetite and coughing.…

September 21, 2020 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Government officials have warned that gardeners are at a higher risk of catching Legionnaires’ disease because Legionella bacteria, which live in moist organic material, thrive in bags of potting mix and compost. One official says that cases typically spike in early November, but that in she sees cases notified from September onward due to an increase in gardening activity. Three weeks ago, a 59-year-old keen gardener was using potting mix to plant some seedlings in his greenhouse. He began to feel unwell but thought it was just the flu. But the fevers quickly turned to coughing up blood. He was…

July 24, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

New York City health officials first learned of a cluster of Legionnaires’ Disease cases in Washington Heights in early July. Since then, eight confirmed cases have more than doubled with the current total inching toward two dozen. The outbreak has already proven fatal with one death, and several confirmed cases still hospitalized. Health Officials have indicated that the “Lower Washington Heights” outbreak stems from an infected cooling tower. The health department has conducted testing on over 20 cooling towers and have affirmed that drinking water is safe despite the rise in cases. Early reports show that affected individuals are between…

April 9, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

In a previous post, we discussed an introduction to water system maintenance. More detailed resources, however, can clearly be of great assistance in situations like this. As such, the CDC actually provides a great page to review other significant guidelines and standards that may be applicable. Resources on the page include everything from ASHRAE to the Cooling Tower Institute however what’s also of interest is that the page provides links to more healthcare-specific guidelines including those from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as well as, of course, the CDC’s own guidelines on both matters. Here are some of…

April 8, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

About a month ago, Transparency Market Research estimated that the global legionella testing market was valued at US$180 million in 2016. In addition, Transparency Market Research also estimated that the testing market would reach around US$398.7 million by 2025. Perhaps one of the biggest factors for future growth moving forward is that the incidence rate is increasing globally, particularly in developing regions. With this higher incidence of infectious diseases comes a steady increase in the demand for diagnostic kits and with it the global legionella testing market is expected to substantially grow. As it stands now, the incidence rate of…

April 5, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Assessing plumbing systems can sometime feel like a task which you are going to be inherently blind in. After all, regular testing is important however pinpointing the exact location of clusters can often be difficult. Luckily, there appears to be a new model which may help public health authorities assess water quality. According to one of the co-authors and civil and environmental engineering professor Wen-Tso Liu, “(P)revious studies have relied on reproducing the conditions of a stagnant plumbing system within a lab setting,” however for this study, the team was “able to collect samples in a real-life situation.” The team collected…

April 4, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

A preliminary report released yesterday suggests that a substantial upgrade of the Illinois Veterans Home at Quincy is the best route for resolving the Legionella issues there. This makeover, however, is estimated to cost as much as $278 million. The report describes a brand new residence with new plumbing and a well to serve as a separate water source. This report by the task forces which the governor had organized says the new facility would not only include Legionnaires’-resistant piping, but could be built to adapt to the changing needs of veterans moving forward. A final report is expected on May 1.…

April 3, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

A Dallas senior living community was required to treat the water in two of their buildings after the country health department detected a case of Legionnaires’ disease. Mr Jeff Getek, Highland Spring Senior Living spokesman, has said that the retirement community was initially notified of the positive Legionnaires’ disease test by the Collin County Department of Health. In addition, Mr. Getek also added that this was an “isolated situation,” with no other residents at the Far North Dallas community having reported symptoms. One of the residential buildings where the resident with Legionnaires lives will have water restriction until the health…

April 2, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Over the course of the past few weeks, we have covered cooling towers and how they can serve as potential breeding grounds for Legionella bacteria. This appears to be the case in Long Island as a school district there announced that Legionella bacteria was found in the cooling towers at three of their schools. According to the Sachem Central School District at Holbrook’s superintendent, James Nolan, the bacteria was detected in the cooling towers at Seneca, Sequoya and East schools after conducting scheduled testing in order to be in compliance with New York state regulations. Once discovered, the cooling towers…