May 31, 2022 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Following the diagnosis of Legionnaires’ disease in four local men in Southwest Sydney, a fifth and sixth case have been identified. So far, two women and four men between the ages of 40 and 70 have been diagnosed. They all visited locations between Elizabeth St, Clarence St, Park St, and Martin Place in the 10 days before experiencing symptoms. Thus far, all six cases have been treated in a hospital and one person has been discharged.   The New South Wales Ministry of Health is continuing to advise people who have been in the Sydney CBD area in the past…

April 19, 2022 zacherlaw 0 Comments

In December 2020, the European Union (EU) revised the Drinking Water Directive by approving a new set of rules that extended Legionella monitoring to every potable water system in the EU. The new rules entered force on January 12, 2021, with new member states having two years to transpose them into national legislation. Member states are left free to determine their approach to testing, as they can choose the methods they find most appropriate for the purposes of sampling Legionella. In response to this, a new study has been initiated in Italy comparing the culture methods of testing for Legionella…

April 10, 2022 zacherlaw 0 Comments

On March 11, the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) and the Illinois Department of Public Health released a joint press release announcing that Legionella bacteria had been detected in two Illinois prisons-Stateville Correctional Center and Joliet Treatment Center. However, an IDOC spokesperson has now confirmed that the actual number of prisons with confirmed Legionella in the water supply is five. Legionella was also found in Graham Correctional Center, Kewanee Life Skills Re-Entry Center, and Stateville Northern Reception and Classification Center.  Legionella is the bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal type of pneumonia. Legionella bacteria primarily moves from water…

August 24, 2021 zacherlaw 0 Comments

The CDC recently published recommendations for the best practices of disinfecting a hot tub that contains Legionella. It is vitally important that hot tubs are properly disinfected when Legionella is found. Hot tubs are a well-documented source of Legionella, the bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ disease. As the water heats up, some of the water particles are aerosolized. These are then inhaled by those in and around the hot tub. If these particles contain Legionella, there is a chance that the individual who inhaled it could get very sick. The first step in the disinfection process is to close the hot tub immediately.…

August 21, 2021 zacherlaw 0 Comments

The New Jersey Department of Health is investigating a potential outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in Essex County, NJ. Between July 16 and July 26, eight suspected cases were reported to the Department of Health. All of the infected individuals either reside in Essex County or have recently visited Essex County. [1] The New Jersey Health Commissioner, Judy Persichilli, urges any individual that resides in or has visited Essex County in the past two weeks to visit their doctor if they begin experiencing symptoms. Symptoms can include fever, fatigue, headache, muscle aches, chills, shortness of breath, loss of appetite and coughing.…

September 21, 2020 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Government officials have warned that gardeners are at a higher risk of catching Legionnaires’ disease because Legionella bacteria, which live in moist organic material, thrive in bags of potting mix and compost. One official says that cases typically spike in early November, but that in she sees cases notified from September onward due to an increase in gardening activity. Three weeks ago, a 59-year-old keen gardener was using potting mix to plant some seedlings in his greenhouse. He began to feel unwell but thought it was just the flu. But the fevers quickly turned to coughing up blood. He was…

July 24, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

New York City health officials first learned of a cluster of Legionnaires’ Disease cases in Washington Heights in early July. Since then, eight confirmed cases have more than doubled with the current total inching toward two dozen. The outbreak has already proven fatal with one death, and several confirmed cases still hospitalized. Health Officials have indicated that the “Lower Washington Heights” outbreak stems from an infected cooling tower. The health department has conducted testing on over 20 cooling towers and have affirmed that drinking water is safe despite the rise in cases. Early reports show that affected individuals are between…

April 9, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

In a previous post, we discussed an introduction to water system maintenance. More detailed resources, however, can clearly be of great assistance in situations like this. As such, the CDC actually provides a great page to review other significant guidelines and standards that may be applicable. Resources on the page include everything from ASHRAE to the Cooling Tower Institute however what’s also of interest is that the page provides links to more healthcare-specific guidelines including those from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as well as, of course, the CDC’s own guidelines on both matters. Here are some of…

April 8, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

About a month ago, Transparency Market Research estimated that the global legionella testing market was valued at US$180 million in 2016. In addition, Transparency Market Research also estimated that the testing market would reach around US$398.7 million by 2025. Perhaps one of the biggest factors for future growth moving forward is that the incidence rate is increasing globally, particularly in developing regions. With this higher incidence of infectious diseases comes a steady increase in the demand for diagnostic kits and with it the global legionella testing market is expected to substantially grow. As it stands now, the incidence rate of…

April 5, 2018 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Assessing plumbing systems can sometime feel like a task which you are going to be inherently blind in. After all, regular testing is important however pinpointing the exact location of clusters can often be difficult. Luckily, there appears to be a new model which may help public health authorities assess water quality. According to one of the co-authors and civil and environmental engineering professor Wen-Tso Liu, “(P)revious studies have relied on reproducing the conditions of a stagnant plumbing system within a lab setting,” however for this study, the team was “able to collect samples in a real-life situation.” The team collected…