October 28, 2020 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Government officials have warned that gardeners are at higher risk of catching Legionnaires’ disease because Legionella bacteria, which lives in moist organic material, thrives in bags of potting mix and compost. Twenty-three known cases have been reported this year. Legionnaires’ Disease is caused by Legionella bacteria, which grows in moist, organic material. People can catch the disease by inhaling airborne droplets or particles containing the bacteria. To reduce dust, and therefore the likelihood of inhaling contaminated particles, gardeners can spray water onto their soil bags before use. When using soil, gardeners should wear masks, work in a ventilated area, and…

September 11, 2017 zacherlaw 0 Comments

How many of you have used Scott’s Miracle-Gro Garden Soil for Flowers and Vegetables? My client did, and in a lawsuit brought in federal court he is alleging he contracted Legionnaires’ disease from using the product. The evidence that has been provided so far shows that the same type of Legionella bacteria found in the bag he used was also found in his body while in the hospital. Other evidence shows that Legionnaires’ disease has been associated with manufactured soils in the United States and overseas. Yet no warnings about the dangers associated with Legionnaires’ disease existed on the bag…

May 1, 2017 zacherlaw 0 Comments

Legionella infections are most commonly associated with cooling towers, hot tubs, pools, showers, and decorative fountains. However, exposure to legionella bacteria can occur through other, more obscure means. Legionellosis (Legionnaires’ Disease) manifests when aerosolized droplets containing legionella bacteria make their way into a patient’s lungs. Legionella bacteria typically is inhaled in through water droplets, but contaminated soil has been found to cause Legionnaires’ Disease on numerous occasions. In Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Japan, more attention has been paid to the potential risks of acquiring Legionnaires’ Disease or Pontiac Fever from contaminated potting soil. In New Zealand, there was 121 reported…

February 23, 2017 zacherlaw 0 Comments

53-year-old New Zealand resident, Susan Dromgool, slipped into a two-week coma after contracting Legionnaires’ disease in December 2016.  She had been using potting soil to plant succulents and believed she had taken the appropriate safety measures since she wore gloves and used the potting mix in a well-ventilated area.  However, the evening after planting the succulents, she began to experience chills and her symptoms progressively got worse.  She was admitted to the hospital and put in an induced coma.  She woke up approximately two weeks later with no memory of the events surrounding her illness. Ms. Dromgool gradually recovered and…