Jul
03
2015
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Following tests conducted in June 2015, officials at the West Palm Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center have indicated that Legionella bacteria remains present in the hospital’s water supply. The bacteria which causes Legionnaires’ disease has been detected in the hospital’s water supply on multiple occasions in 2015.

More information on the hospital’s most recent water test results and its plan to eradicate Legionella from its water supply can be found here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 12:28 pm
Jul
01
2015
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Elevated levels of Legionella bacteria were recently discovered in water sources within the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Hospital. The hospital is affiliated with the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

University officials note that measures aimed at preventing a potential outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease have already been undertaken and are ongoing.

More information on this story can be found at http://www.click2houston.com/news/legionnaires-disease-scare-at-galveston-prison-hospital/33883624.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 10:55 am
Jun
30
2015
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Lacey

Officials in Thurston County, Washington have indicated that two recent Legionnaires’ disease cases are connected to a motel in Lacey. Health officials say the motel is being tested for the presence of bacteria which causes the illness.

Hotel whirlpools, showers, and air conditioning units have previously been shown to be sources of Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks.

To read more about this outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease, please visit http://q13fox.com/2015/06/29/thurston-county-investigates-2-cases-of-legionnaires-disease/.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 10:47 am
Jun
25
2015
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Quebec City

A class-action lawsuit has been filed by Legionnaires’ disease victims and family members who lost loved ones in the outbreak of the disease in 2012 in Quebec City.  During this Legionnaires’ disease outbreak, 14 people died of the illness and over 180 others became ill after being infected by the bacteria.

A cooling tower at a downtown office building was discovered to be the source of the outbreak.

To read more about this story, please click here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 3:53 pm
Jun
24
2015
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The Standard

According to a recent article from The Standard, a news source in Hong Kong, the Centre for Health Protection is investigating the case of a 52-year-old man with Legionnaires’ disease who is in critical condition.

The man has been at Ruttonjee Hospital since June 21 and tested positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

To read more about this, please click here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 5:47 pm
Jun
23
2015
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James Cook Univ hospital

A ward at James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough was closed on May 15 after Legionella bacteria were discovered in the water system.  Patients staying in the ward were moved  after the discovery.

It does not appear, however, that any patients developed Legionnaires’ disease as a result of the bacteria’s presence.

According to a spokeswoman for South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, “Following a routine inspection of the water supply on Ward 33 at James Cook University Hospital, we moved patients to Ward 11 to allow us to carry out further testing as a precautionary measure.  We can confirm that no patients have been affected by Legionella bacteria.”

To read more about this story, please click here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 9:59 am
Jun
22
2015
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Ottawa Jean Edmonds Tower

The Jean Edmonds Tower in Ottawa now has Legionella bacteria levels that are “well within safe levels” according to a recent article in the Ottawa Citizen.

The building underwent testing on June 12 after an contracted employee with Citizenship and Immigration Canada had contracted Legionnaires’ disease.

According to the test results, Legionella were not detected in two of the tests, while the other six tests were found to have less than 25 cfu/mL (cfu = colony forming units).

The Public Works and Government Service Canada indicates that Legionella levels below 100 cfu/mL are acceptable and the Ontario Public Health says that if Legionella levels ever exceed 1,000 cfu/mL, immediate action must be taken.

These figures are quite different from recommendations in the United States.  OSHA’s suggested guideline is that “[Legionnaires’ disease bacteria] concentrations in cooling towers, evaporative condensers, and fluid coolers” should remain below 10cfu/mL.

To read more about this story, please click here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 4:13 pm
Jun
19
2015
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Rhodes Tower Columbus OH

The Rhodes Tower in Columbus, Ohio has shut off its hot water system after test results came back positive for Legionella bacteria.

The Columbus Dispatch obtained a memo from the Department of Administrative Services  which indicated that in addition to shutting off the hot water system, the hot water tanks and pipes have been drained, and “heavy chlorination” will occur this weekend.

The hot water is expected to be back on by Monday, June 22.

To read more about this story, please click here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 3:46 pm
Jun
18
2015
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Place du Portage

Legionella bacteria have been found in Ottawa, Canada in the domestic hot water supply of Place du Centre as well as the cooling tower at 30 Victoria St.  The water systems of each building were immediately shut down.  The hot water system is set to stay off for approximately two to three more weeks.

These discoveries occurred just one month after the bacteria were discovered the Place du Portage, a government complex in Gatineau.

According to the Public Works and Government Services Canada, the cooling tower is said to now be clear of bacteria.

To read more about this story, please click here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 2:37 pm
Jun
16
2015
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Legionella petri dishes

An outbreak of six Legionnaires’ disease cases is believed to be associated with an industrial cooling tower in the Canterbury area of Christchurch New Zealand.

The first cases were reported in April and two additional cases were reported in May.  As of May 25, there are no new cases.

All patients were hospitalized for their illness and spent an average of six days in the hospital.

The cooling tower suspected as being the source of the outbreak is located in Hillsborough and tested positive for the presence of Legionella bacteria.  It was treated immediately after the positive finding.

According to Dr. Raymon Pink, medical officer of health for the Canterbury region, the District Health Board has been encouraging the industry to test and treat cooling towers.

To read more about this story, please click here.

Posted by jzacher">jzacher at 10:07 am